Essays on socrates justice

While Socrates was critical of blind acceptance of the gods and the myths we find in Hesiod and Homer, this in itself was not unheard of in Athens at the time.  Solon, Xenophanes, Heraclitus, and Euripides had all spoken against the capriciousness and excesses of the gods without incurring penalty.  It is possible to make the case that Socrates’ jurors might not have indicted him solely on questioning the gods or even of interrogating the true meaning of piety.  Indeed, there was no legal definition of piety in Athens at the time, and jurors were therefore in a similar situation to the one in which we find Socrates in Plato’s Euthyphro , that is, in need of an inquiry into what the nature of piety truly is.  What seems to have concerned the jurors was not only Socrates’ challenge to the traditional interpretation of the gods of the city, but his seeming allegiance to an entirely novel divine being, unfamiliar to anyone in the city.

© Copyright 2014 Kenneth J. Maxwell Jr.
    All Rights Reserved

Learn more

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

essays on socrates justice
Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

© Copyright 2014 Kenneth J. Maxwell Jr.
    All Rights Reserved

Action Action

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

essays on socrates justice

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Second

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Third

Essays on socrates justice

Action Action